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ETD 51 A. What are the 5 requirement for a population to be at Hardy Weinberg equilibrium? B. What does that mean?
February 26, 2014 at 11:33am

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Sophie Wulfing
March 02, 2014 at 10:16pm

5 requirements for equilibrium: 1) no mutations, 2) no natural selection, 3) random mating, 4) a large population which reduces the chance of allele frequency, 5) No gene flow - immigration / emigration

Used to measure whether the population is evolving

Sophie

I sometimes confuse Gene flow- the introduction of a foreign source of genes with genetic drift-the chance of certain alleles being passed on. This is seen in a small population, where the frequency of alleles will randomly begin to shift to one side.

Riley Hajek
April 02, 2014 at 8:14pm

I learned that it is possible, but not common for a population to be at Hardy Weinberg equilibrium, a state in which it is not evolving.  In order for this to happen, all five of the following must occur: no mutations, random mating, no natural selection, a large population must exist and no gene flow in or out of a species. 

Tracy Hajek

Riley Hajek

I learned better what was meant by random mating. Basically  what it is, is that if individuals mate with there relatives then there gametes will not mix and genotype frequencies do not change.

Madison Boggan
February 05, 2015 at 5:43pm

Parent: Being at Hardy Weinberg equilibrium means that a population is not changing. The requirements in order to make this happen are no mutations, no natural selection, no gene flow, must have random mating and must have a large population. The opposite of these things cause evolution.

Student: As I taught this idea to my mom, I realized even more myself that these 5 requirements are more easily understood when they are thought of as going both ways (either causing evolution or preventing it). I wrote this down in my journal during class but I understood it even better when I had to teach it to someone myself.  

Amber Neathery
February 22, 2016 at 7:30pm

Student: I listed and explained the five requirements in a population for Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium to be reached. The population must have no mutations, no sexual selection, no gene flow (emigration or immigration), and no natural selection. Lastly, the population must be large in order to reduce the odds of genetic drift, or the role of chance in changing the allelic frequency of a population. The perfect setup for Hardy Weinberg equilibrium might appear to be unlikely, but genetic mutations are fairly rare and gene flow can be limited depending on the environment; an island would have significantly less emigration and immigration than an inland environment. Natural and sexual selection can also be controlled in domestic environments, say, in an fish tank with limited potential mates and little selective factors.

 

Parent: in order to have hardy weinberg equilibrium many requirements have to be met. at first it seemed odd that we would use hardy weinberg equations if it is so specific but amber explain that it sometimes can. also hw can let you see how much a population evolves.

Zach Holtz
February 11, 2020 at 10:42pm

Student:   It was nice to go over the requirements for Hardy Weinburg equilibrium.  They are no mating, no natural selection, no gene flow, random mating, and an extremely large population.  All these together lead to hardy Weinburg equilibrium.  What all these means that the population is not evolving and is staying the complete same.  There cannot be any changes in genes, no one leaving or entering the population, not having a picky environment, not caring who to mate with, and not having a small population.

Parent:  I learned that if a population is changing or evolving, at least one of the Hardy Weinberg equilibrium conditions is not met.  The conditions are 1) No mutations. 2) Random mating. 3) No natural selection. 4) Extremely large population size. 5) No gene flow. 

Alaina Brady
February 11, 2020 at 11:21pm

Parent: Hardy Weinberg Equilibrium is a theory that allows calculation of allele frequencies within a population.  5 conditions much be met to allow this.  1.  No mutations as they introduce new alleles 2. No Natural Selection as the "weaker" population dies out.  3.  No gene flow - individuals moving in or out   4.  Random mating - any male and female could mate  5.  A large population to ensure no one group is wiped out by random event.

Student: I explained that hardy weinberg equilibrium is a state in a population where allele frequencies remain constant over generations. The five requirements for Hardy Weinberg equilibrium are, no mutations, no natural selection, no gene flow, random mating, and a large population. Mutations introduce new alleles into a population, which changes allele frequencies. Natural selection alters allele frequencies by selecting for or against certain phenotypes. Gene flow either brings in new alleles or removes some, either way disrupting the frequency. Random mating ensures that every male and female individual is a potential mate, removing inter or intrasexual selection or any other selection from being able to alter frequencies, and a large population reduces the risk of genetic drift, 

Alaina Brady
February 11, 2020 at 11:22pm

Parent: Hardy Weinberg Equilibrium is a theory that allows calculation of allele frequencies within a population.  5 conditions much be met to allow this.  1.  No mutations as they introduce new alleles 2. No Natural Selection as the "weaker" population dies out.  3.  No gene flow - individuals moving in or out   4.  Random mating - any male and female could mate  5.  A large population to ensure no one group is wiped out by random event.

Student: I explained that hardy weinberg equilibrium is a state in a population where allele frequencies remain constant over generations. The five requirements for Hardy Weinberg equilibrium are, no mutations, no natural selection, no gene flow, random mating, and a large population. Mutations introduce new alleles into a population, which changes allele frequencies. Natural selection alters allele frequencies by selecting for or against certain phenotypes. Gene flow either brings in new alleles or removes some, either way disrupting the frequency. Random mating ensures that every male and female individual is a potential mate, removing inter or intrasexual selection or any other selection from being able to alter frequencies, and a large population reduces the risk of genetic drift, 

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