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ETD 9: A. Draw + Explain the different levels of protein structure + explain how it relates to your ribbon model? + B. What is an Enzyme + What do they do?
September 30, 2013 at 3:39pm

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Benjamin Niesner
October 13, 2015 at 10:26pm

Student: I explained to my Dad the different levels of protein structure, going through each level pointing out certain charges. I also made connections to the transcription/ translation process (gene to protein model) in the primary structure of the polypeptide and how that polypeptide go there with its Amino Acid chain. 

Parent: Benjamin shared with me the different levels of a protein structure

1. First is the Primary level which was explained to me as similar to a ribbon with bumps.

2. Next is the Secondary which was explained as a coil or coils.

3. The next level is the Tertiary level which is also the folding stage.

4. Lastly, we have the Quartinary level which can best be described as the combining stage.

Kate Freeman
January 13, 2016 at 11:07pm

Parent: I learned about the Primary, Secondary, Tertiary, and Quaternary levels of protein structure. Kate used her ribbon from class as a model to walk me through each step of the structure which was very helpful. Kate also taught me that enzymes are chemical machines or functional proteins that act as catalysts. She explained that enzymes are molecular scissors and staplers that can both make and break bonds.

Student: I taught my dad that the 4 different levels of protein structure are Primary, Secondary, Tertiary, and Quaternary. The Primary level is a polypeptide made up of amino acids. I connected the polypeptide to ridges on a ribbon from  our model. The Secondary level is created from either an alpha helix or beta pleated sheet. This represents the coil of the ribbon. The Tertiary level is the folding stage, which represents folding the ribbon. In the Quaternary level the ribbon is twisted as R-group interactions lead to the combination of two polypeptides. I found this review helpful as I could connect the breaking and making processes of enzymes to the previous ETD's explanation of Hydrolysis and Dehydration Synthesis for a better understanding of the enzymatic process.

Makaila Heifner
January 15, 2016 at 10:25am

Parent: Makaila explained there are four different levels of protein structure; I found this interesting because I had never really considered that proteins have a structure, let alone four levels. I had more of an understanding about the function and definition of an enzyme but Makaila explained the enzymes more in depth. 

Student: We went over the four levels of protein structure and I used the ribbon we made in class to help explain each level: 

1) The primary level is made up of an amino acid chain (polypeptide bumps), and consists of peptide-strong bonds. I explained that each ribbon represent the Primary structure of protein.

2) The secondary level is made up of pleated sheets with hydrogen bonds, it also coils (I showed the ribbons twisted together to illustrate the coil). 

3) The tertiary level is when the structure folds, the tertiary level consists of Hydrogen and ionic bonds. The ribbons show this by being stuck together. 

4) The last structure of protein is the Quaternary level which results in globules of the pleated sheet and ribbons and use R-group interactions, and thus make up the protein.

We also discussed what an enzyme is and what exactly it does. We went over that an enzyme is a kind of protein that help catalyze reactions, because of this they could be considered chemical machines. More or less, their major function is to make and break various substances in reactions. 

Adam Wulfing
January 19, 2016 at 5:53pm

Parent:  Different levels of protein structure:  Polypeptide.  Secondary level forms forms plates or helix.  Tertiary folds and compacts. Quaternary level multiple tertiary combine

Student:  Its good to get more in depth in the process of making proteins. especially when they make up such important roles in cells.

Jacob Michaels
November 28, 2017 at 4:17pm

Parent- Primary structure is a polypeptide sequence and the part of the model it represents is the bumps.  Secondary structure is the alpha helix and beta pleated sheet.  Its the crimps and coils, from the model it is the coil helix.  Tertiary structure is for folding on itself and it is the fold part of the model.  Quaternary structure is folding together into usable structures and it is the twist and fold together part of the model.

An enzyme is a functional protein, its one or more polypeptides acting as a catalyst.  They can be anabolic which means they add, or catabolic which means they cut.

Student- I went over the four levels of protein structure with my dad briefly explaining each level of protein structure and explaining which part of the model is represented by each level. I then told him what an enzyme is and how there are two different types of enzymes that have different roles.

Brody Magbaleta
January 07, 2018 at 6:22pm

Parent: There are 4 stages of protein structure. Primary is a polypeptide sequence which are little bumps of amino acid. Secondary is a coil which is a helix shape and held together by hydrogen bonds. Tertiary is when coil folds on itself. R group interacts and hydrogen bonds hold it together. Quaternary is a combination of folding together. 

There are anabolic enzymes that add together ie. stapler ad catabolic which cuts them apart ie. scissors. 

Student: I discussed the four levels of protein structure and how we had a model in class that represented the bumps, the coil, folding, and a combination. I also went over the force that holds the protein together at each stage such as peptide bonds, hydrogen bonds, and R group interactions. I also explained what an enzyme is and how it is a functional protein that acts as a catalyst in chemical reactions. Also, it was good to review the two different types of enzymes, anabolic and catabolic, along with their functions. 

Joey Ribera
January 16, 2018 at 7:07pm

Parent: There is primary, secondary, tertiary, and quaternary. The primary is a line up of amino acids and have peptide bonds. The secondary is a helix or a b pleated sheet. The tertiary is a folding of itself. Quaternary is the combination of the polypeptides. The R-groups attract together polypeptides. 

Enzymes a function proteins meaning they are a chemical machine that make or break stuff. I fit is anabolic then it adds together and if it's catabolic it cuts apart.

Student: I taught my parents about the different levels of protein structures. I taught how the primary has an amino acid chain. Secondary has an alpha helix (keratin) and beta pleated sheet. Tertiary is folded and has R-groups interactions with methyl, hydrogen holds, ionic bonds, and disulfide crossbridge. Quaternary has R- group interactions and it attracts polypeptide together. Enzymes are functional proteins and anabolic adds and catabolic cuts. Reviewing thee helped me understand the distinctions between each protein structure.

Nicole Stan
January 15, 2019 at 4:38pm

Parent: Nicole taught us about the different levels of protein structure and how in level 1/the primary level there were peptide bonds and an Amino acid chain. The secondary level contains crimps+coils and pleats+helix in the shape of alpha helix’s and a B-pleated sheet. In the tertiary level, there are folds which are H-bonds and disulfide cross bridges interacting. In the Quaternary level, there are combinations of polypeptide functional proteins. She also explained that an enzyme is a functional protein of 1 or more polypeptides that acts as a catalyst. They are like chemical machines that make and break things. She said that anabolic means to add things together while catabolic is cutting apart something.

Student: I showed my parents my ETD notebook so they could see the drawings of the 4 different levels of protein structure with the bumps, coils, folds and combo for the primary, secondary, tertiary and quaternary levels. I also explained to them what an enzyme is and their function and the difference between anabolic and catabolic and how anabolic is like a stapler because it adds things together and catabolic is like a cat because cats scratch and catabolic is cutting something apart.

Sarah Kropelnicki
January 21, 2019 at 6:03pm

Parent: Sarah showed me how each stage of protein structure looks and what happens in each. There is the primary, where an amino acid chain is formed in a V shape, secondary, where a beta pleated sheet is formed, tertiary, where the protein folds, and the quaternary level, where the functional protein becomes an enzyme in a combo of polypeptides. 

Student: I completely forgot everything about each stage of protein structure, but as I tried to teach each of them to my mom, it started to come back a bit. I remembered the broad ideas of each stage, but not the important little details like the force of primary being peptide bonds which are covalent. 

Sarah Kropelnicki
January 21, 2019 at 6:04pm

Parent: Sarah showed me how each stage of protein structure looks and what happens in each. There is the primary, where an amino acid chain is formed in a V shape, secondary, where a beta pleated sheet is formed, tertiary, where the protein folds, and the quaternary level, where the functional protein becomes an enzyme in a combo of polypeptides. 

Student: I completely forgot everything about each stage of protein structure, but as I tried to teach each of them to my mom, it started to come back a bit. I remembered the broad ideas of each stage, but not the important little details like the force of primary being peptide bonds which are covalent. 

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